• LOGIN
  • Nenhum produto no carrinho.

Why movement is important in combat

When talking about martial art, one of the biggest mistakes that’s made is the lack of distinction between self defense and sport. Martial art can be practiced seeking self defense or sport and even as a form of spiritual upliftment. But a sport should not be confused with self defense.

In sport blocking an attack is easy with some workout. You block quickly and dodge quickly to dodge punches that are worth points to your opponent. You know that the fight will have a certain duration (usually some 5-minute rounds) and that there are rules to follow. If the rules are broken, the opponent loses points and may even be disqualified. There’s a same weight category and the fight happens in a controlled environment, usually flat and with a certain area. Leaving that area can also make you lose points.

In actual combat this does not happen. You have no idea how long the fight will last and it’s allowed everything: finger in the eye, kick in the low parts, etc. You will hardly find a fluffly environment like the mat and there will always be irregularities and obstacles on the floor. Just think about the sidewalk of your street or your work. Are there broken stones, holes, a tree root that causes unevenness? Do you know how to walk on this uneven terrain without having to look at the ground? There are, unfortunately, numerous cases of domestic violence in Brazil. In an emergency situation, do you know how to move indoors, inside a kitchen or bathroom? Http://www.brasil.gov.br/cidadania-e-justica/2016/11/violencia-domestica-e-causa-de-do-do-tercos-of-agressoes-contra-a-mulher

Another important aspect to consider is that situations are not fair. If you have not learned this yet in life, learn it now. When we speak of self-defense, you will be at a disadvantage. You may face someone taller, stronger, or more resourceful (knives, weapons) than you and sometimes with one or more opponents.

These differences change everything in the real combat and in how teaching must be faced. Teaching self-defense in the same way as teaching a sport is an irresponsibility that can put people’s lives at risk. It is common, unfortunately, news of martial arts champions who, faced with a real combat situation, were shot, stabbed or killed.

Therefore, we do not train as a sport. We train with responsibility, assessing situations and aware of the consequences, as putting one’s life at risk. One of the essential ways to do this is through movement.

One of the principles that underlies Systema is movement. Proper movement is always emphasized in class: you must master the movements that your body can do. One learns to move in block, to move only a segment and more important, to move naturally, as if walking in the street. In fact, it is in the street that much of the real conflicts happen.

We do not block a punch. We move and take the body away from the attack. If possible we re-direct the attack. When attempting to block a punch from a person stronger than you there are two possibilities: you break your arm trying to stop the punch or can not stop and be hit the same way. Another important aspect is that we recognize that in actual combat you will be hit. A punch should not stop you from continuing to defend yourself. We seek humility to recognize that, even with the best training, you can still be beaten. By moving the body properly we try to reduce the impact of a punch. Thus increasing the chances of survival.

Systema comes from a Cossack tradition, from medieval-style fights with long swords and a chain mail (if you were in a good financial condition you would have armor). Can you imagine someone trying to block a sword? The video below tries to exemplify what can happen:

Systema is a practical, effective and efficient martial art. And why do we say this with such confidence?

Slavs, in general, have very peculiar behavioral characteristics. They are practical and often this practicality is seen as a form of introspection. If it is necessary to speak, one speaks. If it is necessary to do something, it does.

This cultural aspect of the Slavs is also present in the martial art. In the Systema we do not have a combination of postures. The basic posture is you standing, relaxed. We do not have a series of techniques for a specific defense. We train principles that can be applied to all situations, whatever they may be.

Thus the Systema practitioner learns that movement is critical to increasing the chances of having a positive outcome in a given situation.

This cultural aspect of the Slavs is also present in the martial art. In the Systema we do not have a combination of postures. The basic posture is you standing, relaxed. We do not have a series of techniques for a specific defense. We train principles that can be applied to all situations, whatever they may be.

So the Systema practitioner learns that movement is critical to increasing the chances of having a positive outcome to a given situation.

28/07/2017

Quer saber mais?

Entre em contato conosco

contato@artemarcialrussa.com.br
Rua Capital Federal 102 São Paulo/sp
11 2368-1027

11 99942-7902

Venha para uma aula experimental!

Assine nossa Newsletter

  Fique por dentro das novidades
© Systema Brazil. Todos os direitos reservados
X